The Forgotten Story Of The Women Behind The British Black Panthers

BB: So [I know] you’re going to ask me about Beyoncé, let me tell you first of all, I have zero interest in Beyoncé. I don’t kinda pretend to have an interest in her, I looked at the video you were talking about, it was Formation right? There was a link from an older American man, probably someone who was from the Panthers, the phrase he said I liked was being a black panther was not about being cool and hip it really was people who put their life on the line, some people died in order to make a point for racial and social justice.

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Abel de la Barra, primer comandante afroboliviano

El aún coronel Abel de la Barra ingresó a la historia esta lunes al ser designado como el primer comandante general de la Policía de origen afrodescendiente.

  Continue reading “Abel de la Barra, primer comandante afroboliviano”

UK Premiere of ‘The Black Fatherhood Project’ with Panel Q&A, Sat 3 Sept, @UpstairsRitzy

McIntosh County Shouters: Gullah-Geechee Ring Shout from Georgia

The McIntosh County Shouters is a ten-member Gullah-Geechee group that began performing professionally in 1980. They have educated and entertained audiences around the United States with the “ring shout,” a compelling fusion of counterclockwise dance-like movement, call-and-response singing, and percussion consisting of hand claps and a stick beating the rhythm on a wooden floor. African in its origins, the ring shout affirms oneness with the Spirit and ancestors as well as community cohesiveness. The ring shout was first described in detail during the Civil War by outside observers in coastal regions of South Carolina and Georgia. Its practice continued well into the 20th Century, even as its influence was resounding in later forms like spiritual, jubilee, gospel and jazz. Continue reading “McIntosh County Shouters: Gullah-Geechee Ring Shout from Georgia”

Wilhemina’s War – a force in her family’s fight for survival from HIV & AIDS

In much of America, progress in HIV/AIDS treatment and improvement in education may suggest the worst is behind us, but every year 50,000 Americans are still diagnosed with the virus that causes AIDS. Astonishingly, nearly half of them live in the South, where the AIDS epidemic has taken root in rural communities, and is one of the leading causes of death among black women.

Wilhemina’s War is the story of Wilhemina Dixon, an uneducated daughter of sharecroppers who becomes a force in her family’s fight for survival from HIV and AIDS. Shot over the course of five years, the film bears witness to the resilience and determination of the human spirit in the face of tremendous adversity.

Wilhemina, or “Mina,” as everyone calls her, knows little about public policy, but a great deal about caring for the sick. Five of her family members are living with HIV, and she is the caregiver for her daughter, Toni, a drug addict, and her teenage granddaughter, Dayshal, born with HIV and now the victim of online bullying.

While Wilhemina struggles to save her family, South Carolina politics only increase her burden as Governor Nikki Haley rejects billions of federal dollars available through the Affordable Care Act, a decision with devastating implications for those in need. Undaunted, Wilhemina soldiers on, taking a cue from her state’s motto: While I Breathe, I Hope.

documentary page: http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/films/wilheminas-war/

Summer camp for black children provokes outrage; parents angered by ‘exclusion of white children’: Why do these people never challenge white supremacy? — Black Women of Brazil

Note from BW of Brazil: In today’s post we feature an excellent example of how racism and white supremacy is maintained in Brazil while citizens and leaders of the country insidiously proclaim the country to be a place where “we are all equal”. We’ve seen this type of incident before so it’s not particularly surprising but […]

via Summer camp for black children provokes outrage; parents angered by ‘exclusion of white children’: Why do these people never challenge white supremacy? — Black Women of Brazil